The Neosecularist

I Said That? Yeah, I Said That!

Why Atheists Give Secularists A Bad Name (And Reputation)

Liberal atheists, at any rate.

In the town of Whiteville, Tennessee there a cross above the local water tower.  It won’t be there for much longer.  It is being taken down after the threat of a lawsuit from The Freedom From Religion Foundation (FFRF), the result of one person who had complained about its presence making them uncomfortable.  The cross is not disappearing.  It will have a new spot on a private peace of land where its mayor, James Bellar, claims it will be seen by even more people and thus, have a greater, more spiritual impact.  Still -

The town should have fought like hell to keep it there.

That is, if the majority of residents support its being there.

Why is it that so many towns and villages, and even big cities, are so willing , so quick, to give in and give up to these types of groups like the FFRF, the ACLU and Americans Untied For Separation of Church and State (AU)?  Especially considering there is nothing really unconstitutional about having a cross sitting atop a city water tower.  Yes, the cross is a religious (Christian) symbol.  So what?  Whiteville is a very religious community.  The people who live there like to acknowledge their Christian heritage both as a source of pride among themselves and to visitors.  What’s wrong with that?

In other words, unless the FFRF can prove that it is the town government, directly, which is forcing this cross to remain atop the water tower, and is compelling its citizens to view it, acknowledge it, worship it and accept it; and if it is the town government, directly, which is imposing fines and/or jail sentences, or any type of punishment for not doing so  – there is nothing illegal or unconstitutional going on in the town of Whiteville.

Remember the movie Footlose? (it’s being remade)  It revolved around the small town of Bomont in where a fanatical Christian minister, played by John Lithgow, had a tight grip around the town and had the community in such fear of his authority, which he used to ban dancing and rock music.  Of course the movie had a happy ending, and the fanatical minister had a change of heart.  The point to this is that this is how groups like the FFRF view Christian communities similar to that of Whiteville.  As if to have a cross on a water tower, or as part of a city seal, or even in its public schools, somehow creates an unnecessary, uncomfortable, unconstitutional  religious “authority” and “fear” and “tightens” religion’s grip.

If the cross was atop the water tower because the local church demanded it be there, and they so had the town of Whiteville in fear of its authority, and the church was using that authority and fear to essentially and effectively rule the town of Whiteville, then that would be unconstitutional.  But where is that he case?  Where is that the case anywhere in America?  Religion is being torn down and removed from the public square because anti-religious zealots like the FFRF have a radical agenda to eliminate it everywhere they see it and replace it with atheism – liberal atheism.  Not so much a religion in of itself, but it does seek to dominate and control the masses, just as the FFRF greatly fears religion does.

And this war against religion which atheists have been waging for decades now not only hurts religion (which is its intent) it hurts the very secularism and secularist outlook which these groups purportedly are trying to promote and expand.  There may very well be a fundamental difference between atheism and secularism, perhaps enough of a rift to cause a schism within secularism itself.  (This may also be a good thing to have happen)  Particularly within conservative secularism, because there really is not much difference in moral outlook between a religious conservative and a secular conservative, except that the religious conservative will look to the bible more so for answers and solutions and guidance, whereas a secular conservative will use other means to analyze a problem and derive at a solution.

It is the liberalism within atheism and secularism, and even the liberalism within Christianity, Catholicism and Judaism, which is perverting the landscape and causing people to lose their moral way and sense of moral judgement.

The way to counter the liberal atheistic influence is to fight it.  But only if there is a majority support for that fight.  This is key because there is a difference between government sponsoring, promoting and propagating religion (which is unconstitutional) and a community of civic minded people, but not part of government, which, as a majority, votes to keep a cross on its water tower, as part of its city seal, in its schools, etc.  This is not unconstitutional.

The people, directly, have the right to make and set the laws of their own communities.  They certainly do not need outsiders coming in, threatening lawsuits.  And they certainly do not need meddlesome individuals (as in one person “uncomfortable with a religious symbol) making trouble for the entire town.

This is an area where conservatives, both religious and secular, can come together, if we have that courage.  It is the liberal element within atheism and secularism that is the threat to America and American morals.  Long has it gone unchallenged.  The longer it continues to go unchallenged, the more American society begins to accept, and become accustomed with, the idea that our Constitution really does say freedom from religion, rather than freedom of religion.

And when that happens who, or what, is the real winner?

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October 6, 2011 - Posted by | ACLU, atheism, politics, religion | , , , , , , ,

6 Comments »

  1. “What’s wrong with that?”

    Because the number of people supporting something doesn’t change whether that thing is constitutional or not.

    “The longer it continues to go unchallenged, the more American society begins to accept, and become accustomed with, the idea that our Constitution really does say freedom from religion, rather than freedom of religion.”

    You can’t have one without the other.

    Unless you’re not free from Judaism, and I can get a bunch of my Jewish friends to stone you for working on the Sabbath.

    Comment by NotAScientist | October 6, 2011 | Reply

    • The number of people, a majority, can constitutionally make and change law. There are certain constitutional guarantees for the “minority”. However, the Constitution prohibits government from establishing religion, not the people.

      Since I am not Jewish, I should not have to worry about being stoned for working on the Sabbath. However, there are many secular Jews, and should any of them work on the Sabbath and other fellow Jews attempt to harm them for doing so, American law clearly states that type of vigilance is unconstitutional.

      The point is, it is liberalism, and the liberalism within Atheism, which is working in an unconstitutional manner to remove religion from the American landscape under the false guise of “freedom from religion”. That is the unproductive approach to take. And it makes a mockery of common sense and logic.

      Comment by Neosecularist | October 6, 2011 | Reply

  2. While I agree that FFRF should choose it’s battles more wisely, you lost me on:

    “Religion is being torn down and removed from the public square because anti-religious zealots like the FFRF have a radical agenda to eliminate it everywhere they see it and replace it with atheism – liberal atheism.”

    You can’t “replace” religion with atheism. Everyplace without a religious symbol is not an “atheist” place. It’s the same spot in the universe it was before. It just doesn’t have a religious symbol there anymore.

    Comment by oldancestor | October 6, 2011 | Reply

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  5. I happen to be native american, female and I was a christian.
    Frankly this attitude of my way or the highway that stems from christian arrogance is really starting to provoke me.

    I grew up in the bible belt, where this majority rules, and if you dont like it, tough
    mentality was very dominant. There is something called karma and it seems
    to me, some “christian” states are becoming less so. For example, Florida
    was once very christian, until pro choice people rallied together and said they had enough
    the point im trying to make is, life can be a real mean pit bull, if you
    dont realize that you cant get everything you want without paying a price.
    Everything has a price, even non christians know that according to you narrow
    viewed believers we are all going to hell, but that is a risk we are willing to make
    and its one I would be willing to bet my soul on, which NOBODY owns.

    Comment by Bandimore fox | October 29, 2011 | Reply


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